Evolve
The future of meat
The demand for meat is growing due to population growth, high-protein diet trends, and socioeconomic factors. Consumers want diversity--not just animal meat--but more sustainable. ethical, and plant-based options too. New alternative meat/protein sources are coming to the market targeting choosy eaters as early adopters.
Here's 4 of them
Plant-based 'meat'
Clean meat
Insects and bugs
Plant-based protein
Here's 4 of them
Plant-based 'meat'
Clean meat
Insects and bugs
Plant-based protein
New vegetarian products on the market are copying the look and mouth-feel of real meat, making vegetarian options much harder to distinguish from the real thing. Impossible Foods replicated heme, an iron-rich molecule found in meats and other foods, from plants to offer a more authentic flavor and texture in their vegetarian meat product. Beyond meat sells meat-like staples (ground beef, sausage, and chicken) directly in the meat section of the grocery store.
1. Plant-based 'meat'
New vegetarian products on the market are copying the look and mouth-feel of real meat, making vegetarian options much harder to distinguish from the real thing. Impossible Foods replicated heme, an iron-rich molecule found in meats and other foods, from plants to offer a more authentic flavor and texture in their vegetarian meat product. Beyond meat sells meat-like staples (ground beef, sausage, and chicken) directly in the meat section of the grocery store.
1. Plant-based 'meat'
Also known as "cultured meat" or lab-grown meat
2. Clean meat
Rather than copying the taste and feel of meat, scientists making 'clean meat' are taking a different route. They are culturing small samples of cells from live animals and replicating them to grow meat in labs. This technique eliminates the slaughtering of animals and doesn't require hormones or antibiotics. Because it's grown in a lab, the chance of cross-contamination from e.coli and other pathogens is minimized. The current cost of production is high, but companies like Memphis Meats and Mosa Meat are working to make this more viable. This technology is also being explored for the seafood industry by Blue Nalu. Investors are also interested in this as we just saw Motif Ingredients receive $90 million in funding to develop lab-grown protein replacements for animal products.
2. Clean meat aka lab-grown meat or cultured meat
Rather than copying the taste and feel of meat, scientists making 'clean meat' are taking a different route. They are culturing small samples of cells from live animals and replicating them to grow meat in labs. This technique eliminates the slaughtering of animals and doesn't require hormones or antibiotics. Because it's grown in a lab, the chance of cross-contamination from e.coli and other pathogens is minimized. The current cost of production is high, but companies like Memphis Meats and Mosa Meat are working to make this more viable. This technology is also being explored for the seafood industry by Blue Nalu. Investors are also interested in this as we just saw Motif Ingredients receive $90 million in funding to develop lab-grown protein replacements for animal products.
3. Bugs and insects
Insects and bugs are a key protein source for cultures in many parts of the non-Western world and this trend is starting to show up in the US. Promoting them as "Super foods", Don Bugito has created snackable treats made from crickets and mealworms. And the Newport Jerky Company sells a range of bug-based products, marketing them as "Natural" and "Paleo". When you're ready to try them, you can even buy them on Amazon.

4. Plant-based protein
While similar to #1, plant-based protein isn't seeking to look and taste like meat, but replace it, nutritionally, with plant-based ingredients. Pea protein is one example that you might see at the moment. There is some unique research going into this too--Sustainable Bioproducts is investigating how to make a complete protein from microbes that live in harsh environments like volcanoes.
Consumers crave more protein that is sustainable and ethical. They're willing to branch out from traditional meat sources and try new things. Concurrently, the food industry is on the bandwagon--throwing money, research, and marketing into this new world of alternative protein sources.
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